If you experience any problems with your viewer after performing a basic install, our first recommendation is to reinstall with a clean install. A clean install is also the best way to avoid many potential issues the first time.Last week, the Hamburg-based research firm Komjuniti published the first extensive survey of Resident attitudes toward real world marketing in Second Life.These two points offer a sliver of hope to the metaverse marketer.

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Teleporting is to SL Advertising What the Channel Clicker is to TV Ads The standard means of travel in SL is point-to-point teleportation, near-instantaneous transit from one x,y,z location to another.

(Though it gets more press, Superman-esque flying is mostly used in short, localized bursts to get around obstacles.) P2P teleporting renders billboards and most other location-based advertising useless, and in any case, most SL marketers buy and develop on private virtual islands, where they can fully control the branding experience.

Due to server architecture, however, these islands are only accessible by teleportation, making it the ultimate opt-in experience.

Giving marketers the unique challenge of getting Residents to voluntary dive into their ad, and stay long enough for any kind of meaningful brand immersion.

As bleak as these numbers may seem, it’s worth noting that they aren’t actually too far off from reactions to traditional Internet advertising.

For example, four years after Net-based advertising had reached full fury, Yankelovich Parterns conducted a 2004 study and found that 60% of consumers had a significantly more negative opinion of marketing and advertising on the Web now than a few years previous, while 65% described themselves as feeling constantly bombarded by ads online.

Back then, the world was ooh-ing and aah-ing at virtual real estate millionaires who were appearing on the cover of magazines like Businessweek, buying and selling land and goods in an ambitious effort to create a cohesive digital world.

But although you probably haven't heard much about it lately, Second Life hasn't gone anywhere.

So in a relatively similar space of time, advertisers and brand promoters in Second Life have managed to annoy their potential customers only slightly more then their established brethren.

More worrying, however, are another pair of numbers: while 41% of respondents in the Yankelovich study said that Internet advertising had at least some relevance to them, a mere 7% of respondents in the Komjuniti study say that the SL-based promotion would have a positive impact on their future buying behavior. Not necessarily for a lack of desire, because the Komjuniti participants also report “they would like to be able to interact more with the brands represented” in SL; metaverse versions of established hotels and retail brands garner the most positive reaction.

(Surely several interns can host regular activities at their company’s SL site?