Although the music was often used to express opposition to then Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos and his use of martial law and the creating of the Batasang Bayan, many of the songs were more subversive and some just instilled national pride.

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Nowadays, Pinoy is used as an adjective to some terms highlighting their relationship to the Philippines or Filipinos.

Pinoy rock was soon followed by Pinoy folk and later, Pinoy jazz.

Ayun na nga, nakuha ko na number niya at naging hesitant pa ako kung itetext ko siya.

Pero dahil sa libog kong nararamdaman at titi kong galit na galit na, tinext ko siya ng "Hi" at bigla naman siyang tumawag sakin.

"Pinoy" gained popular currency in the late 1970s in the Philippines when a surge in patriotism made a hit song of Filipino folk singer Heber Bartolome's "Tayo'y mga Pinoy" ("We are Pinoys").

This trend was followed by Filipino rapper Francis Magalona's "Mga Kababayan Ko" ("My Countrymen") in the 1990s and Filipino rock band Bamboo's "Noypi" ("Pinoy" in reversed syllables) in the 2000s.

"Pinoy music" impacted the socio-political climate of the 1970s and was employed by both Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos and the People Power Revolution that overthrew his regime.

Recent mainstream usages tend to center on entertainment (Pinoy Big Brother) and music (Pinoy Idol), which have played a significant role in developing national and cultural identity.

The following are the more notable earliest usages: In the United States, the earliest published usage known is a Philippine Republic article written in January 1924 by Dr. Juliano, a member of the faculty of the Schurz school in Chicago - "Why does a Pinoy take it as an insult to be taken for a Shintoist or a Confucian?