Glass was first blown in the Mideast two thousand years ago but attention to collecting has only been around for about the past century.Antique bottles and glass of all eras including the very recent are collectible and sought after, although arguably the hayday of glassblowing for many collectors is the second half of the 19th century.According to historian Rhea Mansfield Knittle (, 1927), one of the earliest glass manufacturers in the United States (not counting the unsuccessful attempts at Jamestown in 16) who may have produced considerable quantities of glassware and actually met with some degree of success, was Johannes Smedes (or Jan Smedes), who operated an establishment — probably making bottles for the most part– sometime in the period of 1654-1664 at New Amsterdam (now known as New York City) . What elements/chemicals were included in the glass “recipe”? If it’s an older, hand-blown bottle, who was the glassblower who fashioned it?

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Bottles, jars, jugs and containers of all types, antique fruit jars, glass insulators, fishing net floats, EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass), Depression Glass, antique children’s mugs, and other items are some of the forms of glass I enjoy learning more about.

I’m interested in the general history of the glass manufacturing industry in the United States, especially within the sphere of container glass, electrical insulators and tableware (both pressed and blown).

Glass-making factories in earlier days were, for the most part, rather unpleasant places……

the general inside environment could be, and often was, brutal.

That particular example probably dates from sometime between 19.

I hope this site will be a help in your quest to discover more information concerning the wide world of glass and glass manufacturing.

Can the company / maker be identified by the markings on it? All of these questions might come to mind to the collector or layman, flea market shopper, historian, archaeologist, or casual hobbyist………..