Business Insider obtained a PDF guide that is sold online for just £2.59.It details how scammers operate fake dating site profiles in order to con men out of money.Andrew Kennedy, for Pym, told the panel that the dentist was going through difficulties in his family life at the time.‘The chances that on his first use of a dating website the first thumbnail he would chance on would turn out to be a patient must be infinitesimally small,’ he said.‘He was going through a prolonged and problematic divorce and he was running a business that was barely wiping its feet.‘There were issues in his private life and that led to a need, an inappropriate need I accept, for emotional support.’When he renewed contact for short period the following March, the woman forwarded the messages to his wife.

It's called the "cashing out" stage, and it's where scammers start to ask for money.

Up until now, scammers were instructed to turn down any requests for a Skype call, but if the target insists, then they should ask him to pay for a webcam.

It's not just guns and drugs that are up for sale on deep web sites.

Vendors also list guides on how to commit other illegal activities.

That's a sure sign that the account is fake, as the photo must have been circulating on the internet.

Step two in the dating scam guide deals with "developing a virtual relationship." Scammers are told to ask lots of questions about their targets, paying particular attention to their past relationships.

The guide isn't available for free, in fact, it was being sold for Bitcoins on a deep web marketplace.

Bitcoin is cryptographic currency favoured by criminals as it allows semi-anonymous online transactions.

This screenshot shows a user of a hacker forum being advised that a quick way to find sets of photos is to automatically download them from Facebook: Even before a scammer messages you, you can spot they're fake by checking their photos.

Performing a Google image search for an account's profile picture will show you where on the internet the image appears — sometimes you'll see it attached to Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts with various different names.

They are then instructed to take the information learned, and then create the "perfect woman" for the target.