However, if you wish to detect any errors and monitor changes in your credit profile over time, you may wish to review a single credit report every four months.

A: Because credit reports contain sensitive personal information, access to them is limited.

Information about a lawsuit or an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, whichever is longer.

You can order one, two, or all three reports at the same time, or you can request these reports at various times throughout the year.

The option you choose will depend on the goal of your review.

A: If you are denied credit, insurance, or employment–or some other adverse action is taken against you, such as lowering your credit limit on credit card account–because of information in your credit report, the lender, insurance company, or employer must notify you and provide you with the name, address, and phone number of the credit bureau that provided the credit report used to make the decision.

You can get a free credit report from this credit bureau if you request it within sixty days after receiving the notice.

To opt-out, call 888-5-OPTOUT (888-567-8688) or visit

You will need to provide certain information in order to opt-out, such as your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth.

Each credit bureau gets its information from different sources, so the information in one credit bureau’s report may not be the same as the information in another credit bureau’s report.

A: You can get one free credit report every twelve months from each of the nationwide credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union–by You will need to provide certain information to access your report, such as your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth.

This site–maintained by the Federal Reserve Board–provides answers to some of the most common, and most important, questions about credit.

A: A credit report is a record of your credit history that includes information about: A: Your credit report is important because lenders, insurers, employers, and others may obtain your credit report from credit bureaus to assess how you manage financial responsibilities.

For example: A: There are three major credit bureaus–Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union–that gather and maintain the information about you that is included in your credit report.